BCHERP

Baxalta Canadian Hemophilia Epidemiological Research Program

The goal of the Baxalta Canadian Hemophilia Epidemiological Research Program (B-CHERP) is to provide Canadian investigators with new resources to conduct quality population-based clinical research in hereditary bleeding disorders in Canada. It is hoped that proposals will capitalize on the existing network of comprehensive care hemophilia clinics throughout Canada and assets such as the Canadian Bleeding Disorder Registry (CBDR). However, this will not be a limiting condition. The importance of supporting new investigators and of consolidating the research careers of young investigators will be considered when evaluating proposals.

Application Cycle: New Grants and Renewals

Calls for applications will go out in JUNE 2016 with a deadline for submission of August 30th 2016. Apply here

The results of the competition will be announced by October 1st and funding will be disbursed in December 2016. Candidates that are applying for the renewal of a grant already funded also have until August 30th 2016 to submit updated results to support continued funding in 2016.

New Grants Available in 2016

B-CHERP will fund one new research proposal in 2016 with a maximum grant of $75,0000 for the first year, renewable annually for up to a total of 3 years. Two proposals may be funded if the sums requested are less than $75,000 in the first year.

BAXALTA’S PARTNERSHIP WITH AHCDC

Since 2005 Baxalta and the Association of Hemophilia Clinic Directors of Canada (AHCDC) have entered into a partnership to advance hemophilia research in Canada.

RESEARCH TYPE & SCOPE

The program will support and fund clinical, descriptive and epidemiological studies of hereditary bleeding disorders. While inquiries of correlations between clinical and biological or genetic determinants are expected, the program will not support strictly fundamental research. For the purpose of this program, hereditary bleeding disorders include hemophilia A and B including inhibitor patients, Von Willebrand disease, and other rare inherited bleeding disorders. The importance of supporting new investigators and of consolidating the research careers of young investigators will be considered when evaluating proposals.